The Aspirin for Christmas Spending Hangovers

Brent Pittman —  12/26/2012 — 7 Comments
Do you need a cure for your overspending hangover? Credit

Do you need a cure for your overspending hangover? Credit JGlasen

Your head is pounding and eyesight blurry as you stumble out of bed towards the bathroom in case your queasy stomach decides to explode.

No, this isn’t a normal hangover due to imbibing on your family’s secret eggnog.

This is a full blown Christmas spending hangover.

Christmas Spending Hangover: The Symptoms

If you are like many this holiday season, you’ve spent too much on Christmas gifts and parties with money you really didn’t have.

You might have even charged it on high interest credit cards or opened up a new store credit card to get 10% off your purchase.

About right now your stomach may have that unwanted queasy feeling thinking,

How will I pay off my Christmas overspending binge?

Don’t worry–you’re not alone in your holiday overspending and there is a cure.

Christmas Spending Hangover: The Asprin

If you want to clear your head from overspending this holiday there is an aspirin that can help.

Hard work.

Yes, I know that that isn’t the cure you wanted to hear and you’re about to click away from this article, but stick with me a minute.

It will be worth it. Your relationships will benefit. Your stress level will decrease. Peace will abound.

How can this happen? Hard work.

Hopefully you can make a few sacrifices with your budget to get back on financial track and minimize your holiday spending binge.

For others this Christmas overspending may be a symptom of a lifestyle of overspending, debt, and lack of financial planning.

If that is you–start by reading and applying my How to Budget Like a Pro series and plan to avoid overspending next year.

Christmas Spending Hangover: Avoiding Next Year

If you’ve experienced a holiday spending hangover, I hope you’re motivated to avoid the headache again and have a debt free Christmas next year.

Use these tips to avoid overspending next Christmas and have a Christmas with no regrets:

Budget for Christmas each month. If you want to have Christmas money to spend in December, start saving in January.

Say you’d like to have $1,200 to spend on Christmas–you’ll just need to set aside $100 each month from your monthly budget. It really is that easy.

Plan your spending by using something like this awesome downloadable Christmas Budget form.

Buy less stuff for your kids next year. Try this as a Christmas gift idea for your kids next year

Buy something:

1) they need

2) they want

3) to wear

4) to read

I hope you find the aspirin for your Christmas overspending hangover and realize that a debt free Christmas is worth the hard work.

If you need financial help or have a question about debt and budgeting–I’m glad to help Email brent at ontargetcoach dot com

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Brent Pittman

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Brent is a financial coach and writer looking for the perfect donut. He believes personal finance should be both fun and accessible to anyone willing to learn.
  • krantcents

    A little planning goes a long way to avoid the shopping headache. A budget and a list provides the discipline for something that can get out of hand easily.

    • http://www.ontargetcoach.com/ Brent Pittman

      Truth!

  • http://www.lifeofasteward.com Loren Pinilis

    Two things help us: building gifts into our monthly budget so we are accruing a gift fund and shopping during odd times in the season to maximize deals. It also gives us the chance to maybe make something or do a low-money, high-thought gift.

    • http://www.ontargetcoach.com/ Brent Pittman

      Shopping during odd times is great, especially if you already have money saved up.

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  • http://twitter.com/RFIndependence Pauline

    I like the idea for kids, it has really gone crazy with mountains of gifts and as long as all the kids get the same amount of presents everyone should be just fine.

    • http://www.ontargetcoach.com/ Brent Pittman

      I must confess I learned it from my sister. We’ll be applying it next year.